Presentation Title

Investigation of the Role of Bacterium, Rhodococcus Fascians in Fasciation of Common Dandelion, Taraxacum Officinale

University

Shawnee State University

Major

Biology, Biomedical Science

Student Type

Undergraduate Student

Presentation Types

Oral Presentation

Keywords:

Botany, Microbiology, Bacteriology

Description

In Spring 2018, a large number of specimens exhibiting fasciation, an abnormal growth pattern, were noted in dandelions, Taraxacum officinale. Multiple plant taxa display fasciation. Cause could be due to numerous factors, one such being a bacterial pathogen Rhodococcus fascians. A lab study to satisfy Koch's Postulates was conducted under greenhouse conditions, The goal was to identify the role of R. fascians in fasciation of T. officinale. Following inoculation and growth, no fasciation was observed in experimental plants, nor could the pathogen be reisolated. The same trend was observed in sweet pea seedlings for control of pathology. Field studies are continuing through Spring 2019 to examine rates of fasciation and incidence of R. fascians under natural conditions.

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dan Chaffin

Faculty Sponsor Title

Associate Professor of Biology

Faculty Sponsor Academic Department

Natural Sciences

Location

LIB 204

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Investigation of the Role of Bacterium, Rhodococcus Fascians in Fasciation of Common Dandelion, Taraxacum Officinale

LIB 204

In Spring 2018, a large number of specimens exhibiting fasciation, an abnormal growth pattern, were noted in dandelions, Taraxacum officinale. Multiple plant taxa display fasciation. Cause could be due to numerous factors, one such being a bacterial pathogen Rhodococcus fascians. A lab study to satisfy Koch's Postulates was conducted under greenhouse conditions, The goal was to identify the role of R. fascians in fasciation of T. officinale. Following inoculation and growth, no fasciation was observed in experimental plants, nor could the pathogen be reisolated. The same trend was observed in sweet pea seedlings for control of pathology. Field studies are continuing through Spring 2019 to examine rates of fasciation and incidence of R. fascians under natural conditions.