Trustees' Award Session

Presentation Title

The Effects of Sensory Processing on Mask-Wearing

University

Shawnee State University

Major

Occupational Therapy

Student Type

Graduate Student

Presentation Types

Poster Group Presentation

Keywords:

sensory processing, mask-wearing, COVID-19, public health measures

Abstract

Masks have become an aspect of daily routines affecting the processing of stimuli through changed participation. A survey was created to understand college-aged adults with mask-wearing and how it affects sensory experiences. An optional interview, using the Adolescent-Adult Sensory Profile, was given to express participants’ experiences. Data within 226 survey responses found that 53% of males and 48% of females weren’t overwhelmed wearing masks, though 47% of male participants felt safer. It was also found that 49% of participants with household incomes of $75,000-$150,000 felt safe when wearing masks compared to 48% of participants with income lower than $15,000 feeling overwhelmed. In addition, 87 participants shared experiences with the pandemic, and 3 were interviewed to understand sensory experiences. Common themes were categorized into physical-emotional feelings, response behaviors, and external actions. This study elaborates on links between income and physical response with the willingness to wear masks.

Human Subjects

yes

IRB Approval

yes

Faculty Mentor Name

Christine Raber

Faculty Mentor Title

Professor

Faculty Mentor Academic Department

Rehabilitation Therapies

Second Faculty Mentor

Barb Warnock

Second Faculty Mentor Title

Program Director, Professor

Second Faculty Mentor Department

Rehabilitation Therapies

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Effects of Sensory Processing on Mask-Wearing

Masks have become an aspect of daily routines affecting the processing of stimuli through changed participation. A survey was created to understand college-aged adults with mask-wearing and how it affects sensory experiences. An optional interview, using the Adolescent-Adult Sensory Profile, was given to express participants’ experiences. Data within 226 survey responses found that 53% of males and 48% of females weren’t overwhelmed wearing masks, though 47% of male participants felt safer. It was also found that 49% of participants with household incomes of $75,000-$150,000 felt safe when wearing masks compared to 48% of participants with income lower than $15,000 feeling overwhelmed. In addition, 87 participants shared experiences with the pandemic, and 3 were interviewed to understand sensory experiences. Common themes were categorized into physical-emotional feelings, response behaviors, and external actions. This study elaborates on links between income and physical response with the willingness to wear masks.