Presentation Title

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

University

Shawnee State University

Major

Physical Therapist Assistant program

Student Type

Undergraduate Student

Presentation Types

Poster Group Presentation

Keywords:

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), Physical Therapy, Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF)

Description

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), as noted by researchers at the Mayo Clinic, is a condition characterized by pain occurring in the anterior portion of the knee specifically in the patellar region. Children and young teenagers are at an increased risk of developing the condition compared to older individuals, and females are two times more likely to develop this syndrome than males. Naturally, considering these chief complaints, one of the primary focuses of physical therapy treatment for PFPS is improving strength and reducing pain. Different options are available to address a loss of strength caused by pain, but the most effective methods among the research includes specific therapeutic exercise programs and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques. We have designed a mock experiment to discuss the benefits of each of these treatment approaches to find what works the best at improving strength/function and pain.

Faculty Sponsor Name

Ryan Walker

Faculty Sponsor Title

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy

Faculty Sponsor Academic Department

Rehabilitation and Sport Professions

Location

Morris UC Lobby

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Mar 27th, 4:00 PM Mar 27th, 5:00 PM

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Morris UC Lobby

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), as noted by researchers at the Mayo Clinic, is a condition characterized by pain occurring in the anterior portion of the knee specifically in the patellar region. Children and young teenagers are at an increased risk of developing the condition compared to older individuals, and females are two times more likely to develop this syndrome than males. Naturally, considering these chief complaints, one of the primary focuses of physical therapy treatment for PFPS is improving strength and reducing pain. Different options are available to address a loss of strength caused by pain, but the most effective methods among the research includes specific therapeutic exercise programs and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques. We have designed a mock experiment to discuss the benefits of each of these treatment approaches to find what works the best at improving strength/function and pain.