Presentation Title

Comparison of Vertebrate Roadway Mortality with Speed Limitations

University

Shawnee State University

Major

Natural Sciences

Student Type

Undergraduate Student

Presentation Types

Poster Presentation

Keywords:

Vertebrate, Mortality, Roadkill, Survey, Speed Limits

Description

Roadway mortality surveys are useful for determining species presence and the impact of vehicular traffic on organisms. Mortality surveys complement species diversity and are used in the development of mitigation methods. Frequently, surveys occur for a short duration or take place intermittently over multiple years. Often organisms killed on the road are removed by scavengers or environmental conditions before being documented. Frequent visitation is necessary to more fully understand the extent of mortality. In our study, four 200 meter transects of roadway, representing four speed limits (25, 35, 45, and 55), were selected in Adams County, Ohio. Each transect has been visited during morning hours, three days per week, for one year. Mortality of terrestrial vertebrates, excluding Aves, were photographed, numbered, and identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level. Most specimens recorded have been mammals, while the greatest number of fatalities have been in the 45 and 55 mph zones.

Faculty Sponsor Name

Sarah Minter

Faculty Sponsor Title

Associate Professor, Biology

Location

Morris UC Lobby

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Mar 27th, 4:00 PM Mar 27th, 5:00 PM

Comparison of Vertebrate Roadway Mortality with Speed Limitations

Morris UC Lobby

Roadway mortality surveys are useful for determining species presence and the impact of vehicular traffic on organisms. Mortality surveys complement species diversity and are used in the development of mitigation methods. Frequently, surveys occur for a short duration or take place intermittently over multiple years. Often organisms killed on the road are removed by scavengers or environmental conditions before being documented. Frequent visitation is necessary to more fully understand the extent of mortality. In our study, four 200 meter transects of roadway, representing four speed limits (25, 35, 45, and 55), were selected in Adams County, Ohio. Each transect has been visited during morning hours, three days per week, for one year. Mortality of terrestrial vertebrates, excluding Aves, were photographed, numbered, and identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level. Most specimens recorded have been mammals, while the greatest number of fatalities have been in the 45 and 55 mph zones.