Trustees' Award Session

Presentation Title

Documenting Mammal Diversity among Microhabitats in Shawnee State Forest

University

Shawnee State University

Major

Biology

Student Type

Undergraduate Student

Presentation Types

Oral Group Presentation

Keywords:

mammal diversity, small mammal capture, trap efficacy

Abstract

Baseline knowledge of faunal and floral richness and abundance within systems is useful for system management and conservation. We report findings from an ongoing mammalian survey in riparian associated microhabitats within Shawnee State Forest. Survey objectives are met by documenting mammals among three habitats using a variety of live and noninvasive trapping protocols. Trap types include mechanical and game traps. Mechanical trapping has occurred once weekly during the trapping season (March – April, September – December in 2021, January 2022 – present). Camera trapping occurred continually within survey windows. To date, eleven mammal species have been captured. As primary consumers and prey, mammals play a role in the regulation of plant communities, as well as vertebrate and invertebrate populations. In conjunction with our survey, we are also conducting monthly biodiversity assessments for each transect of focus. As our field season extends through April of 2022, preliminary findings will be highlighted.

Human Subjects

no

IRB Approval

no

Faculty Mentor Name

Sarah Ivers

Faculty Mentor Title

Associate Professor of Biology

Faculty Mentor Academic Department

Natural Sciences

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Documenting Mammal Diversity among Microhabitats in Shawnee State Forest

Baseline knowledge of faunal and floral richness and abundance within systems is useful for system management and conservation. We report findings from an ongoing mammalian survey in riparian associated microhabitats within Shawnee State Forest. Survey objectives are met by documenting mammals among three habitats using a variety of live and noninvasive trapping protocols. Trap types include mechanical and game traps. Mechanical trapping has occurred once weekly during the trapping season (March – April, September – December in 2021, January 2022 – present). Camera trapping occurred continually within survey windows. To date, eleven mammal species have been captured. As primary consumers and prey, mammals play a role in the regulation of plant communities, as well as vertebrate and invertebrate populations. In conjunction with our survey, we are also conducting monthly biodiversity assessments for each transect of focus. As our field season extends through April of 2022, preliminary findings will be highlighted.