Trustees' Award Session

Presentation Title

Back to the Wild: A Comparative Study of the Antimicrobial Properties of Humulus lupulus

University

Shawnee State University

Major

Medical Laboratory Technology

Student Type

Undergraduate Student

Presentation Types

Oral Group Presentation

Keywords:

Humulus lupulus, antimicrobial, Minimum Bactericidal Concentration, Natural disinfectant

Abstract

Antibiotic resistance is a rapidly growing issue in the medical field, and the need for new, effective, and sustainable disinfectants has become apparent. Phytochemicals produced in the fruiting structures of Humulus lupulus, common hops, have long demonstrated antimicrobial properties utilized in brewing beer, and have recently been explored as ‘green’ disinfectants. However, varietal differences, especially including wild relatives of cultivated varieties, have not been thoroughly explored. Fruiting cones of six wild hop strains and three commercial cultivars were collected, respectively, from natural field locations and an established research plot in Southern Ohio. Phytochemicals were extracted, concentrated, and utilized to challenge Staphylococcus aureus using Minimum Bactericidal Concentration tests. Preliminary results indicate phenotypic differences between strains in the amounts and types of phytochemicals extracted and their antimicrobial efficacies.

Human Subjects

no

IRB Approval

no

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Logan Minter

Faculty Mentor Title

Assistant Professor of Biology

Faculty Mentor Academic Department

Natural Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Back to the Wild: A Comparative Study of the Antimicrobial Properties of Humulus lupulus

Antibiotic resistance is a rapidly growing issue in the medical field, and the need for new, effective, and sustainable disinfectants has become apparent. Phytochemicals produced in the fruiting structures of Humulus lupulus, common hops, have long demonstrated antimicrobial properties utilized in brewing beer, and have recently been explored as ‘green’ disinfectants. However, varietal differences, especially including wild relatives of cultivated varieties, have not been thoroughly explored. Fruiting cones of six wild hop strains and three commercial cultivars were collected, respectively, from natural field locations and an established research plot in Southern Ohio. Phytochemicals were extracted, concentrated, and utilized to challenge Staphylococcus aureus using Minimum Bactericidal Concentration tests. Preliminary results indicate phenotypic differences between strains in the amounts and types of phytochemicals extracted and their antimicrobial efficacies.