Presentation Title

Black Vultures in Southern Ohio: Investigating the Distribution and Behaviors of Coragyps atratus

University

Shawnee State University

Major

Biology

Student Type

Undergraduate Student

Presentation Types

Oral Presentation

Keywords:

Black vultures, Behaviors, Distribution

Description

Black vultures (Coragyps atratus), once non-existent in Ohio, now occur in high abundance in various locations throughout Ohio. Black vultures have experienced northward range expansions in both the 1870s and 1950s, with another likely occurring at present. Due to these expansions, this species has been coming into contact more frequently with humans, which is problematic due to their pest-like behaviors, such as preying on newborn livestock. Despite this, much remains unknown about the species, including why these range expansions have occurred. Our research seeks to provide a better understanding by investigating the distribution and behaviors of C. atratus throughout southern Ohio. Distribution investigation includes weekly site visitations throughout five counties, iNaturalist data, and eBird data. Two large C. atratus flocks in Ross and Clermont counties have been selected for behavioral profiling, and each site is visited for one hour each week to determine abundance and for behavioral profiling analysis.

Faculty Sponsor Name

Sarah Minter

Faculty Sponsor Title

Associate Professor of Biology

Faculty Sponsor Academic Department

Natural Sciences

Location

LIB 204

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Black Vultures in Southern Ohio: Investigating the Distribution and Behaviors of Coragyps atratus

LIB 204

Black vultures (Coragyps atratus), once non-existent in Ohio, now occur in high abundance in various locations throughout Ohio. Black vultures have experienced northward range expansions in both the 1870s and 1950s, with another likely occurring at present. Due to these expansions, this species has been coming into contact more frequently with humans, which is problematic due to their pest-like behaviors, such as preying on newborn livestock. Despite this, much remains unknown about the species, including why these range expansions have occurred. Our research seeks to provide a better understanding by investigating the distribution and behaviors of C. atratus throughout southern Ohio. Distribution investigation includes weekly site visitations throughout five counties, iNaturalist data, and eBird data. Two large C. atratus flocks in Ross and Clermont counties have been selected for behavioral profiling, and each site is visited for one hour each week to determine abundance and for behavioral profiling analysis.